(480) 874-2040

What is Orthopaedic Trauma

 

Dr. Prokuski treats patients with acute fractures of the arms, legs, and pelvis. She also takes care of complications that arise from injuries including non-unions, mal-unions, infections, and amputations. Her elective specialty is post-traumatic elbow reconstruction with over a decade of expertise in making stiff elbows move again.

Services Include:

Treatment of nonunions and malunions

After a traumatic injury, bones don’t always heal correctly even after surgical intervention which can lead to 2 different types of bone healing complications known as nonunions and malunions.

A nonunion is when the bone tissue does not heal after an appropriate recovery period. Bones can take up to 9 months to fully heal. However, in some cases, especially after significant trauma, the body does not produce the necessary bone tissue required to heal the fracture. This may be due to poor surgical technique or it may be the result of the patient’s medical history or not following post-operative instructions. Smokers have a very high risk of developing nonunions as tobacco use inhibits bone (and all types of) healing.

When bones heal, but in an abnormal position, this is referred to as a malunion.

Both nonunions and malunions have similar symptoms:

  • Pain or discomfort
  • Reduced functioning
  • Swelling
  • Bruising

If you have continued pain in the area of a fracture long after the time of the injury, you may have a nonunion. Depending on the nature and severity of your nonunion, Dr. Prokuski  may realign the bones, use plates for stability, and/or perform a bone graft to stimulate healing. If your nonunion includes damaged hardware from a previous surgery, our surgeons will need to remove that as well. In some instances, we may collaborate with other specialists and employ hyperbaric oxygen for healing in our treatment of nonunions. Unlike most orthopaedic practices, we enjoy the challenge of correcting these tricky complications.

Malunions are generally only corrected if they cause significant impaired functioning. Your orthopedic surgeon will perform an osteotomy, literally a “cutting of the bone.”  The traumatized bones are carefully re-shapen to shorten, lengthen, or realign them in order to restore proper functionality.

Pelvis and acetabulum surgery

Pelvis and acetabular fractures are some of the most serious and complicated fractures treated by orthopaedic surgeons. Often these types of injuries occur due to trauma from motor vehicle collisions and other types of high impact accidents.

The pelvis is the bony ring that houses your lower abdominal organs. The acetabulum forms the socket on each side of the pelvis into which the top of the femur fits to form the hip joint. In a standard hip fracture, it is the ball portion of the joint that is damaged. A fracture of the acetabulum (socket) is more rare, and in most cases is due to significant trauma, where the ball joint is pushed through the acetabulum, causing the fracture.

Fractures of the pelvis and acetabulum often cause a lot of bleeding and serious damage to surrounding tissues, nerves and sometimes organs. These types of fractures put patients at high risk for future complications. Initially, the goal of the orthopaedic surgical team is to stabilize the area while the patient is treated for life-threatening bleeding or other injuries. Within ten days or up to several weeks later, an orthopaedic surgeon can begin the complex work of re-aligning and repairing the pelvic bones, which may require several surgeries.

The process of re-aligning the bones is known as a reduction. The orthopaedic team may first use an External Fixation technique, using pins and a frame outside the body to stabilize the bones. If the damage is extensive, surgeons may need to perform additionally surgeries to internally place plates and screws in the front and back of the pelvis.

With acetabular fractures, it is especially important to align the bones properly, since misalignment can lead to severe arthritis of the hip, eventually requiring a total hip replacement. Using an open reduction with internal fixation, the orthopaedic surgeon painstakingly re-aligns the bones and places screws and plates to hold them rigidly in place. This is very specialized bone work, and the importance of having a skilled surgeon cannot be overstated.

At Sonoran Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeons, we use the highly advanced MAKO robot-assisted platform to maximize precision and control during pelvic and acetabular reductions. As these types of patients are at extremely high risk of arterial or nerve damage, precision is key. Severe bleeding can also occur as major blood vessels are found in this area. Again, this is highly complex work that should only be done by someone with advanced surgical knowledge and experience.

If you or someone you care about has a pelvic or acetabular fracture, talk to their surgeon about transferring their care to our expert team.

Treatment for infected fractures and osteomyelitis

If you sustain a traumatic injury where the broken bone is exposed through the skin, you are at risk of developing a bone infection. Bone infections can also occur during surgery when bone is exposed, or when bacteria in other parts of the body travel to and infect the bone. An infection of the bone is called osteomyelitis.

Symptoms of bone infection include high fever, pain and tenderness over the site of the infection, a lump, skin reddening, and/or a general feeling of unwellness. Bone infection is often misdiagnosed and can remain dormant for years.

Antibiotics can clear up some infections, but others require surgery. If there is an abscess it will need to be drained. If the infection is affecting other organs and tissues (for example if an infection in the spine is pressing on the spinal cord), you’ll need surgery.

Left untreated, osteomyelitis can lead to nonunions (when bones never properly heal and continue to cause pain years after the injury) or sepsis (a very serious complication where the infection gets into the bloodstream).

In severe cases, especially those that can occur in trauma patients, the infection causes so much bone damage that the result is debilitating. A surgeon must remove dead and infected bone tissue in order for the bone to be able to heal and the patient to regain use of the limb. Our surgeons employ a number of techniques to salvage diseased bone, including the utilization of hyperbaric oxygen to stimulate healing and collaboration with other specialists. Indeed, we specialize in this area, and we use every tool in our kit to help save limbs.

Regardless, amputation may be necessary. In cases of amputation, we use the Ertl technique to optimize the use of prosthetics after healing.

Limb lengthening

Sometimes injury, illness or congenital factors lead to a mismatch in the length of the arms or legs, with one being shorter than the other. After a traumatic injury, sometimes the bones heal in such a way that there is a discrepancy in length between the two extremities. This can happen in children, who are still growing, or in adults who have had a severe fracture, especially where the bone has been broken into several pieces or the fracture was an open fracture causing significant damage to the muscle and tissues surrounding the break. Bone infection can also lead to a limb length discrepancy.

Limb lengthening procedures are extremely complex surgical procedures. They are used when the discrepancy between limb lengths causes significant impairment of mobility, usually involving the femur (thigh bone) or the tibia (shin bone). Limb length discrepancy also puts additional stress on the rest of the musculoskeletal system.

An external lengthening procedure involves cutting the bone in the shorter leg into two pieces and affixing an external fixator, a kind of scaffolding outside the body that is connected to the bone with wires and/or pins. Five to ten days after surgery, the patient or a caregiver will turn the dial on the external fixator to gently separate the bone segments, allowing new bone tissue to form in between them. This is a slow process, with the bone growing about 1 inch per month, more slowly if the patient is a smoker or if the bone was severely damaged. The stabilizer must remain in place several months following the expansion until the new bone has developed sufficient strength.

With an internal lengthening procedure, the surgeon implants an expandable metal rod between the two segments of bone. Rather than being attached to an external scaffolding, the device gradually pulls the bone pieces apart on its own in response to the patient’s natural movements. The rod also keeps the bones aligned and provides stability during the lengthening process. There is less risk of infection and more convenience for the patient with internal lengthening; however, there is also less control over the speed of the lengthening process.

Elbow reconstruction

Dr. Laura Prokuski is an expert in the highly specialized field of elbow reconstruction. In fact, very few orthopaedic surgeons take on these types of cases, which involve complicated and delicate surgeries designed to give patients back mobility in the elbow and to repair disfigurement.

 Dr. Prokuski can make stiff elbows move again, tighten loose ligaments, and repair previous elbow surgeries that left patients with limited mobility. This type of surgery may involve:

  •  Repairing damaged structures
  • Replacing damaged structures with adjacent bone, ligaments, muscles, tendons, skin or nerves
  • Bone fusion
  • Joint replacement
  • Bone spur removal
  • Realignment of fractures
  • Surgical decompression for nerve entrapment

Most patients who consult with us about elbow reconstruction cannot bend their elbows or have other issues which seriously limit their ability to participate in normal activities and enjoy their life.

Our goal with complex elbow reconstruction is to give them back the use of their arm.

Bone and joint transplantation

Advances in the field of orthopaedics now allow people to remain active and healthy well into their golden years. Where osteoarthritis of the knees, hips, shoulders and other joints used to cause significant pain and impairment of mobility, joint transplantation (often called joint replacement) has transformed lives.

Depending on your situation, your orthopaedic surgeon may recommend a partial replacement or total replacement of a joint or joints. During the surgery, the damaged parts of your joint are removed and replaced by an implant called a prosthesis. Today’s prostheses are so advanced that they can handle the stresses of everyday activities, so there are few limitations. The new artificial joints also last long enough that even younger people can have joint replacement surgery without the worry of the implant wearing out.

People who have experienced traumatic injury to their joints or who have had bone tumors removed may also need joint replacement or bone replacement.

Bone replacement is called grafting. The patient’s own transplanted bone material, donated bone material, or synthetic material can be used to replace damaged bone or to fill gaps. Bone grafting can also stimulate healing in nonunions (fractures that aren’t healing). The graft material provides a framework upon which new bone tissue can grow.

Our practice also performs minimally invasive bone grafting.

Minimally invasive bone grafting

Bone grafting involves transplanting the patient’s own bone material, donated bone material, or synthetic material, into an area of missing bone. Bone grafts may be needed when there is a gap due to injury, infection, or tumor removal. They can also stimulate bone regeneration in a nonunion (bone fracture that is not healing properly).

 Traditionally, bone grafting involves an open surgery where the orthopaedic surgeon physically attaches graft material to the damaged area using pins, plates, screws, wires or cables.

In many cases, however, our orthopaedic surgeons can perform a minimally-invasive bone grafting technique which uses a syringe to deliver bone graft material, rather than making a surgical incision.

Bone marrow is harvested from the iliac crest (the uppermost bones of the pelvis). This material is then injected into the nonunion or other area requiring bone regeneration. The surgeon uses imaging to ensure the correct placement of the graft material.

 Minimally-invasive bone grafting avoids the need for an incision and shortens patient recovery times.

Complex soft tissue reconstruction

After a traumatic accident involving fractures, it’s not just the bones that must be fixed. The soft tissues around those bones (muscles, ligaments, veins, arteries, skin) also must be carefully repaired in order to restore functionality to a traumatized body.

These are not easy surgeries, especially since the moment the patient arrives in the emergency room, doctors must quickly make decisions in order to stop bleeding and keep the patient alive. This means that conditions aren’t always favorable for the orthopaedic surgeon who comes in later to perform reconstructive surgery.

Complex soft tissue reconstruction is as much an art as it is a science. Expert reconstructive surgeons have a vast amount of experience in this area, and can assess how to best approach the reconstruction of a traumatic injury. There are many moving parts, and no two injuries are the same.

Some techniques used by our orthopaedic trauma surgeons include:

  • Microsurgery (highly precise surgery done with the use of a microscope)
  • Tissue expansion (balloon placed under the skin or other tissues and inflated slowly to stimulate additional tissue growth)
  • Skin grafts (transplant of skin from another area of the body)
  • Wound closure techniques (special stitches that improve healing outcomes)
  • Relaxing skin incisions (tiny incisions made near the wound to provide more “play” in the skin around the wound)
  • Negative pressure wound therapy and vacuum-assisted closure (uses reduced air pressure to improve healing)
  • Fasciocutaneous and muscle flaps (tissue or muscle transplants with an intact blood supply  from other areas of the body)
  • Bone shortening
  • Ertl technique

Orthopaedic surgeons work with plastic surgeons and other specialists to determine and carry out the best treatment plan for complex soft tissue reconstruction.

Complex upper extremity reconstruction

 Complex upper extremity reconstruction is an extremely specialized facet of orthopaedic surgery. Devastating injuries to the upper extremities often involve bone fractures as well as severe damage to tendons, ligaments, nerves and soft tissue. Blood flow can also be hindered.

 Arthritis or congenital abnormalities affecting the arm or hand may also indicate surgery.

 Techniques used in upper extremity reconstruction may include:

  • Microsurgery (highly precise surgery done with the use of a microscope)
  • Bone grafts (transplanted bone material)
  • Tissue grafts (transplanted skin, muscle or other soft tissue)
  • Tendon transfer (for hand surgery)
  • Nerve transfer (to restore muscle function or sensation)
  • Flaps (tissue or muscle transplants with an intact blood supply)

With upper extremity reconstruction, our orthopaedic surgeons understand that purposeful reconstruction involves many pieces of a puzzle being able to fit together to restore meaningful functionality. Our goal will always be to give our patients the best result that current surgical techniques and technology allow.

Revision surgeries for trauma patients

If you have suffered a traumatic injury in the past and have not recovered as well as you expected, consider seeing one of our orthopaedic surgeons about revision surgery.

 Trauma injuries can be extremely complicated, and your initial amputation or reconstruction surgery may not have employed all of the latest techniques available to restore optimal functionality. Also, complications such as bone infections or nonunions (bones not healing properly) can occur through no fault of the surgeon. Your medical history can also affect how you heal. If you are a smoker, your risk goes up even further.

 Our expert orthopaedic trauma surgeons offer surgical revisions to address post-trauma problems such as:

  • nonunions
  • malunions (healed fractures that are misaligned)
  • bone infections
  • pain
  • stiffness
  • lack of mobility
  • impaired functionality
  • pain associated with the use of prosthetics

We also specialize in areas of orthopaedics that most practices won’t touch, such as elbow reconstruction (making stiff elbows move again, tightening loose ligaments, and restoring mobility). We employ the Ertl technique for amputation revisions so our patients can use their prosthetics more easily without pain or discomfort. We also use state-of-the-art techniques such as minimally-invasive bone grafting for bone regeneration and the MAKO robot-assisted surgical platform for hip replacement and pelvis surgery.

 Our orthopaedic surgeons are experts in their field, having received the most intensive training in orthopaedic trauma treatment and staying abreast of the latest technological advancements.

 If you are a trauma patient who is unhappy with your recovery, come see us for a consultation. With our help your injuries can become a part of your journey, but not your final destination.

 

 

Meet
Dr. Prokuski

A behind the scenes chat with Laura about her love for orthopaedic surgery.

Meet Laura
Prokuski, MD

Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon

Dr. Prokuski treats patients with acute fractures of the arms, legs, and pelvis. She also takes care of complications that arise from injuries including non-unions, mal-unions, infections, and amputations.

Dr. Prokuski was born and educated in the great state of Iowa.  This Midwestern upbringing instilled the values of hard work, personal sacrifice, and the importance of community.

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EDUCATION

 

 

1984-1988

Bachelors of Arts

Coe College

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

1988-1992

Medical Doctor

University of Iowa College of Medicine

Iowa City, Iowa

POST GRADUATE EDUCATION

 

 

1992-1997

Resident in Orthopaedic Surgery

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

Iowa City, Iowa

1997-1998

Fellow in Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery

R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

Iowa City, Iowa

 

APPOINTMENTS

 

 

1998

Consulting Orthopedic Surgeon

William S. Middleton Veterans Hospital

Madison, Wisconsin

1998

Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery

University of Wisconsin Hospitals

Madison, Wisconsin

2006

Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery

University of Wisconsin Hospitals

Madison, Wisconsin

2009

Orthopedic Trauma Surgeon

Sonoran Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeons

Scottsdale, AZ

2013

Director of Orthopedic Trauma

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital

Phoenix, AZ

LICENSURE

 

 

 

 

State

Number

Expiration Date

 

Maryland

D52010

9/30/2013

 

Wisconsin

40045

10/31/2013

 

Arizona

34717

03/18/2016

 

BOARD CERTIFICATION

 

 

2000-2010

American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

2011-2020

Recertfied American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

DEPARTMENT/HOSPITAL COMMITTEES

 

 

2010-present

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital Department of Surgery Committee

2010-present

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital Infection Control Committee

2011-present

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital Operating Room Operations Committee

2007-2009

Hospital Peer Review Committee

2004-2006

Orthopedic Operating Room Inventory Control Committee

2004-2006

Medical Board of University of WisconsinHospital and Clinics, At-Large Member

2004-2006

University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation Retirement Plan Committee

2004-2007

University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation Primary Care Committee

2003-2004

Quality Evaluation and Review Committee

2003-2009

Division of Orthopedic Surgery Quality Improvement Committee, Chair

2001-2005

Wrong Site Surgery Prevention Committee, Chair

2000-2004

Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee

1999-2003

Department of Surgery Quality Improvement Committee

1999-2009

Blood Product Utilization and Review Committee

MEDICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES

 

 

2003-2009

Medical Student Admissions Committee

2004-2005

Department of Radiology Chair Search Committee

PROFESSONAL SOCIETY MEMBERSHIPS

 

 

 

American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS)

 

Orthopedic Trauma Association (OTA)

 

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETY COMMITTEES AND APPOINTMENTS

 

 

2009

OTA Program Committee

2008-2011

OTA Residents’ Basic Fracture Course Chairman

2008

AO Basic Residents Course Co-Chairman, Madison, WI

2007-2008

OTA Quality Metrics Work Group

2008-present

OTA Practice Management committee

2007

Ruth Jackson Orthopedic Society Nominating Committee

2007-present

OTA Education Committee

2007-present

AAOS Representative to American Association of Blood Banks/Perioperative Standards Program Unit

2006-2011

AAOS Patient Safety Committee

2006-2007

OTA Coding and Classification Committee

2005-present

AAOS Representative to Surgical Care Improvement Project

2005

AAOS Representative to the Surgical Care Improvement Project National Guidelines Writers’ Workshop

2003-2008

AAOS Trauma Evaluation Committee

2003-2006

AAOS Infections Committee

HONORS AND AWARDS

 

 

Faculty

 

2004

University Of Wisconsin Medical Alumni Association’s Clinical Science Teaching Award

2004

Magna Cum Laude Citation from Radiological Society of North America for the exhibit “What’s New in Extremity and Spine Hardware”

Medical School

 

1991

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

1991

American Medical Women’s Association Janet M. Glasgow Memorial Citation for Scholarly Achievement

1991-1992

Anesthesia Externship, a salaried position offered to senior medical students for advanced study of anesthesiology

1988-1989

University of Iowa Medical Student Research Fellowship

Undergraduate

 

1988

Magna Cum Laude

1988

Kesler Senior Chemistry Award for the outstanding chemistry student

1988

Swanson Science Writing Award for the outstanding honors thesis

1988

Phi Beta Phi Academic Honor Society

1987

Mortar Board Academic Honor Society

1986-1987

University of Iowa Undergraduate Research Fellowship

RESEARCH GRANT AWARDS

 

 

2003

$50,000 for Primary Investigator on “Effect of Alendronate on Bone Fatigue and Microdamage with and without Adaptation”

2004

Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation Research Grant $9,472 for Primary Investigator on “Effect of Alendronate on Bone Fatigue and Microdamage with and without Adaptation”

2009

Orthopaedic Trauma Association’s Resident Research Grant $10,000 for “Sterility of Intraoperative Irrigation”

PUBLISHED ARTICLES

 

 

1.

Keiser JE, Prokuski LJ, Ong VS. An enzymatic method for the hydrolysis of urinary 1-naphthyl glucuronide. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 1988; 41:159-163.

2.

Moore SA, Prokuski LJ, Figard PH, Spector AA, Hart MN. Murine cerebral microvascular endothelium incorporate and metabolize 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. J Cell Physiol.1988; 137:75-85.

3.

Marsh JL, Prokuski LJ, Biermann JS. Chronic infected tibial nonunions with bone loss: conventional techniques versus bone transport. Clin Orthop. 1994; 301:139-146.

4.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL. Segmental bone deficiency after acute trauma: the role of bone transport. Orthop Clin North Am. 1994; 25(4):753-763.

5.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL. Bone transport in acute trauma. Current Orthopaedics. 1994; 8:152-157.

6.

Rich G, Yoder EJ, Prokuski LJ, Moore SA. Prostaglandin production in cultured cerebral microvascular smooth muscle is serum dependent. Am J Physiol. 1996; 270 (part 1):C1379-C1387.

7.

Prokuski LJ, Saltzman CL. Challenging fractures of the foot and ankle. Radio Clin North Am. 1997; 35(3):655-670.

8.

Brandser EA, Braksiek RJ, Prokuski LJ, et al. Missed fractures on emergency room ankle radiographs: An analysis of 433 patients. Emergency Radiology. 1997; 4:295-302.

9.

Prokuski LJ, Saltzman CL. External fixation for the treatment of Charcot arthropathy of the ankle: a case report. Foot Ankle Int. 1998; 19(5):336-341.

10.

Prokuski LJ, Eglseder WA Jr. Concurrent dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the index, long, ring and small (second to fifth) carpometacarpal joints. J Orthop Trauma. 2001; 15(8):549-554.

11.

Prokuski LJ. Negative Pressure Dressings for Open Fracture Wounds.  Iowa Orthopedic Journal. 2002; 22:20-24.

12.

Lang GL and Prokuski LJ. Failed fixation of the tibial shaft. Techniques in Orthopaedics. 2003; 17(4):468-478.

13.

Prokuski LJ.  Selecting an appropriate prophylactic antibiotic agent.  AAOS Bulletin. 2005; 53 (3): 16-19.

14.

Prokuski LJ.  Duration of prophylactic antibiotics.  AAOS Bulletin. 2006; 54(1): 15.

15.

Prokuski LJ. Treatment of acute infection. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006; Oct14 (10 Suppl):S101-4.

16.

Muir P, Sample SJ, Barrett JG, McCarthy J, Vanderby Jr R, Markel MD, Prokuski LJ, Kalscheur VL.  Effect of fatigue loading and associated matrix microdamage on bone blood flow and interstitial fluid flow.  Bone. 2007; Apr 40(4):948-56.

17.

Barrett JG, Sample SJ, McCarthy J, Kalscheur VL, Muir P, Prokuski LJ.  Effect of short-term treatment with alendronate on ulnar bone adaptation to cyclic fatigue loading in rats. J Orthop Res. 2007; Aug 25(8):1070-7.

18.

Marsh JL, Slongo TF, AGel J, Broderick JS, Creevy W, DeCoster TA, Prokuski L, Sirkin MS, Ziran B, Henley B, Audige L.  Fracture and dislocation classification compendium – 2007: Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification, database and outcomes committee. J Orthop Trauma. 2007; Nov-Dec; 21(10 Suppl):S1-133.

19.

Prokuski L. Prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2008; 16(5): 283-293.

20.

AAOS Patient Safety Committee:  Evans RP, Moucha CS, Clyburn TA, Prokuski LJ. Surgical site infection prevention and control: an emerging paradigm. J Bone Joint Surg. Am. 2009 Nov; 91 suppl 6: 2-9.

BOOK CHAPTERS

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL. Principles of Intramedullary Nailing. In: Oxford Textbook of Orthopaedics and Trauma. Bulstrode C Editor. Oxford University Press, 2002.

2.

Prokuski LJ. Principles of Fractures.  In:  Turek’s Orthopedics:  Principles and Practice, 6th Edition.  Weinstein, SL and Buckwalter, JA Editors, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2004, pp.87-121. 

DEPARTMENTAL PRESENTATIONS/INVITED LECTURER

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ. Distal Humerus Fractures. Dr. Kellam Visiting Professor, October 8, 1999, Madison, WI.

2.

Prokuski LJ. Thromboembolic Disease in Orthopedic Trauma Patients. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 23, 2000, Madison, WI.

3.

Prokuski LJ. What the Orthopedic Surgeon Needs to Know About Bloodborne Pathogens. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 23, 2001, Madison, WI.

4.

Prokuski LJ. Fractures in Immunocompromised Patients. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, September 14, 2001, Madison, WI.

5.

Prokuski LJ. Complications after Tibial Nailing. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 29, 2002, Madison, WI.

6.

Prokuski LJ.  Strategies for Improving Results after Distal Humerus Fractures.  Dr. Morrey Visiting Professor, October 3, 2003, Madison, WI.

7.

Prokuski LJ.  Prevention of Antimicrobial Resistance in Surgical Patients.  Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, October 29, 2003, Madison, WI.

8.

Prokuski LJ.  Initial Wound Care for Open Fractures.  Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 23, 2004, Madison, WI.

9.

Prokuski LJ.  Thromboembolic Disease in the Injured Patient.  General Surgery Trauma Conference, June 16, 2004, Madison, WI.

10.

Prokuski LJ.  Pelvic Fractures in the Multiply Injured Patient.  General Surgery Trauma Conference, June 2005, Madison, WI.

11.

Prokuski LJ.  The Multiply Injured Patient with a Pelvic Ring Injury:  Damage Control Techniques.  Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, July 27, 2005, Madison, WI.

12.

Prokuski LJ.  Surgical Site Infections. Visiting Professor Dr. Swiontkowski, October 28, 2005, Madison, WI.

13.

Prokuski LJ.  Initial Wound Care for Open Fractures.  General Surgery Trauma Conference, October 31, 2005, Madison, WI.

14.

Prokuski LJ. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Orthopedic Surgery. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 27, 2007, Madison, WI.

15.

Prokuski LJ. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Orthopedic Surgery Subspecialties and Emerging Groups at Risk. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, March 26, 2008, Madison, WI.

16.

Prokuski LJ. Severe Open Lower Extremity Trauma. Plastic Surgery Grand Rounds, September 12, 2008, Madison, WI.

17.

Prokuski LJ. Severe Open Lower Extremity Trauma. Phoenix Orthopaedic Residency Program Grand Rounds, May 15, 2009, Phoenix, AZ.

LOCAL PRESENTATIONS/INVITED LECTURER

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ. Pelvic Fractures. University of Wisconsin Health Trauma Update. April 23, 1999, Madison, WI.

2.

Prokuski LJ. Workplace Hazards for the Orthopedic Surgeon. Madison Orthopedic Society Meeting. April 27, 1999, Madison, WI.

3.

Prokuski LJ.  Fractures: General Principles.  Course for Occupational Therapists. September 15, 2003, Madison, WI.

4.

Prokuski LJ.  Scapulothoracic Dissociation.  Little Club Meeting.  September 26, 2003.  Madison, WI.

5.

Prokuski LJ.  Fractures: General Principles.  Course for Occupational Therapists. September 20, 2004, Madison, WI.

STATE AND REGIONAL PRESENTATIONS/INVITED LECTURER

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ. Workplace Hazards for the Orthopedic Surgeon. Wisconsin Orthopedic Society Meeting, June 9, 2000, Madison, WI.

2.

Prokuski LJ. Indications for Nailing Femoral Fractures. AO/ASIF Intramedullary Nailing Course for Operating Room Personnel. July 20, 2001, Milwaukee, WI.

3.

Prokuski LJ. Internal Fixation of Distal Tibia Fractures:  Conventional and Less Invasive Techniques Seminar at the Wisconsin State Orthopedic Society Meeting:  Periarticular Fractures of the Lower Extremity. September 22, 2001, Milwaukee, WI.

4.

Prokuski LJ. Complications after Tibial Nailing. Orthopedic Surgery Grand Rounds, Medical College of Wisconsin. March 27, 2002, Milwaukee, WI.

5.

Prokuski LJ.  Preoperative Planning--A Team Approach.  AO/ASIF Basic Course for Operating Room Personnel. May 21, 2004, Minneapolis, MN.

6.

Prokuski LJ.  Prevention of Antimicrobial Resistance in Surgical Patients.  Wisconsin Orthopedic Society Meeting. June 11, 2004, Lake Geneva, WI.

7.

Prokuski LJ.  Locking Condylar Plating for Proximal Tibia Fractures.  AO/ASIF Locked Plating Symposium.  December 3, 2004, Milwaukee, WI.

8.

Prokuski LJ.  Pelvic Ring Injuries.  AO/ASIF Operating Room Personnel Advanced Course. June 25, 2005, Madison, WI.

9.

Prokuski LJ.  Distal Radial Fractures:  Going Volar?  AO/ASIF Midwest Regional Trauma Summit, September 30, 2005, Madison, WI.

10.

Prokuski LJ. Complications after Tibial Nailing and Initial Wound Care for Open Fractures. Marshfield Clinic Visiting Professor, April 28, 2006, Marshfield, WI.

11.

Prokuski LJ. Pelvic Fractures. Emergency Care and Trauma Symposium, June 22, 2006, Wisconsin Dells, WI.

12.

Prokuski LJ. Surgical Stabilization of Acute Clavicle Fractures Associated with Blunt Thoracic Trauma. Arizona Chapter American College of Surgeons, November 5, 2009, Scottsdale, AZ.

NATIONAL PRESENTATIONS/INVITED LECTURER

 

 

1.

Biermann JS, Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL, Nepola JV. Comparison of Conventional Treatment versus Bone Transport for Chronic Infected Tibial Nonunions. Orthopaedic Trauma Association Annual Meeting, November 2, 1991, Seattle, WA.

2.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL, Biermann JS, Nepola JV. Comparison of Conventional Treatment versus Bone Transport for Chronic Infected Tibial Nonunions with Bone Loss. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting, February 22, 1992, Washington, DC.

3.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL, Biermann JS, Nepola JV. Bifocal Treatment of Bone Deficiencies using a Monolateral External Fixation System. Orthopaedic Trauma Association Annual Meeting, September 25, 1993, New Orleans, LA.

4.

Prokuski LJ. Adult Forearm Fractures. Orthopaedic Trauma Association Residents’ Basic Fracture Course, October 10, 1998, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

5.

Prokuski LJ. Antegrade Femoral Nailing and Tibia Fracture Overview. Current Issues in Orthopedic Trauma, October 15-17, 1998, Indianapolis, IN.

6.

Prokuski LJ. Elbow Injuries and Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures.  Resident Review Course in Adult Reconstruction and Trauma, September 18-19, 1999, Chicago, IL.

7.

Prokuski LJ. Elbow Injuries and Femur Fractures and Limb Salvage. Resident Review Course in Adult Reconstruction and Trauma, September 24-26, 1999, Williamsburg, VA.

8.

Prokuski LJ. Antegrade Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures and External Fixation of Tibia Fractures.  Surgical Management of Adult and Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma, October 28-29, 1999, Indianapolis, IN.

9.

Prokuski LJ and Lang GL. Adult Forearm Fractures. Orthopedic Trauma Association Residents’ Fracture Course, October 24, 1999, Charlotte, NC.

10.

Prokuski LJ. Adult Forearm Fractures. Orthopedic Trauma Association Residents’ Fracture Course, October 12, 2000, San Antonio, TX.

11.

Prokuski LJ. Fractures of the Hand/Fingers. Orthopedic Trauma Association Residents’ Basic Fracture Course, October 19, 2001, San Diego, CA.

12.

Prokuski LJ.  Scapulothoracic Dissociation.  State of the Art in Orthopaedic Trauma: Management of the Critically Injured Patient, April 25-27, 2002, Baltimore, MD.

13.

Prokuski LJ.  Fractures of the Hand/Fingers.  Orthopaedic Trauma Association Residents’ Basic Fracture Course, October 12, 2002, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

14.

Davis KW and Prokuski LJ.  Assessment of Meniscal Integrity in the Setting of Acute Tibial Plateau Fracture.  26th Annual Meeting of the Society of Skeletal Radiology. March 2-5, 2003, Coronado, CA.

15.

Prokuski LJ.  Intramedullary Nailing of Proximal Humerus Fractures.  Chicago Trauma Course, September 6, 2003, Chicago, IL.

16.

Prokuski LJ.  Fractures of the Hand/Fingers.  Orthopedic Trauma Association Residents’ Basic Fracture Course, October 9-12, 2003, Salt Lake City, UT.

17.

Prokuski LJ.  What’s New in Orthopedic Trauma? The 6th Biennial Ruth Jackson Orthopedic Society Meeting, October 25, 2003, Rosemont, IL.

18.

Prokuski LJ.  Proximal Forearm Fractures and Elbow Exposures and Distal Radius Fracture Fixation. AAOS Practical Techniques for Improved Fracture Management, December 5-7, 2003, Rosemont, IL.

19.

Prokuski LJ. Locking Condylar Plating for Proximal Tibia Fractures.  AO/ASIF Locked Compression Plating and Current Concepts:  A Trauma Symposium, March 5, 2004, Cleveland, OH.

20.

Davis KW, Blankenbaker DG, Prokuski LJ.  Understanding the Latest Extremity Fixation Plates.  Society of Skeletal Radiology Annual Meeting, March 13, 2005, Orlando, FL.

21.

Prokuski LJ.  Elbow Contracture Release and Radial Head Replacement.  AAOS/OTA Techniques in Orthopedic Trauma, September 23, 2005, Rosemont, IL.

22.

Prokuski LJ.  Hand Injuries.  OTA Residents’ Basic Fracture Course, October 22, 2005, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

23.

Prokuski LJ.  Treatment of Acute Infections.  AAOS/OTA Extremity War Injuries Symposium, January 25, 2006, Washington, DC.

24.

Prokuski LJ. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orthopaedic Surgery. SCIP: Hospital Interventions Quality Improvement Organization Support, February 12, 2007.

25.

Prokuski LJ. Tibial Plateau Fractures. Chicago Trauma Course, August 11, 2007, Chicago, IL.

26.

Prokuski LJ. Elbow Injuries. AO Basic Course, October 2007, Denver, CO.

27.

Prokuski LJ. Fracture Classification and Tibial Plateau Fractures and Infections. AO Basic Course, February 2008, Houston, TX.

28.

Prokuski LJ. Distal Radius Fractures and Infections. AO Basic Course, August 22-26, 2008, Madison, WI.

29.

Prokuski LJ. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Orthopaedic Surgery. Instructional Course Lecture, AAOS Annual Meeting, February 20, 2009, Las Vegas, NV.

30.

Prokuski LJ. Radial Head Fractures. AAOS/OTA Strategies and Tactics in Orthopaedic Extremity Trauma, November 21, 2009, Rosemont, IL.

31.

Prokuski LJ. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Orthopaedic Surgery. Instructional Course Lecture, AAOS Annual Meeting, March 10, 2010, New Orleans, LA.

32.

Prokuski LJ. Distal Femur Fractures and Elbow Exposures. AAOS/OTA AAOS/OTA Strategies and Tactics in Orthopaedic Extremity Trauma. December 6, 2013, Rosemont, IL.

33.

Prokuski LJ. Approaches to Humerus and Reduction and Fixation Techniques Elbow Fractures. Strategies and Tactics in Orthopaedic Extremity Trauma. December 3, 2014, Rosemont, IL.

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS

 

 

1.

Marsh JL, Prokuski LJ, Biermann JS. Comparison of conventional treatment versus bone transport for chronic infected tibial nonunions with segmental bone loss. The Second Riva Congress; May 30, 1992; Riva del Garda, Italy.

2.

Prokuski LJ, Marsh JL, Biermann JS, Nepola JV. Comparison of conventional treatment versus bone transport for chronic infected tibial nonunions with bone loss. The Ninth Combined Meeting of the Orthopaedic Associations of the English Speaking World; June 22, 1992; Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ, Fredericks DC, Nepola JV. Effects of Vibration on Fracture Healing, Orthopedic Trauma Association Meeting; September 27-29,1996; Boston, MA.

2.

Prokuski LJ.  The Use of an Intramedullary Screw and Tension Band for the Fixation of Olecranon Osteotomies, Mid America Orthopedic Association Meeting, April 23-26, 2003; Hilton Head Island, NC.

3.

Charles SS, Davis KS, Blankenbaker DG, Prokuski LJ, Anderson PA.  What’s New in Extremity and Spine Hardware,  Radiological Society of North America Annual              Meeting. December 2004, Chicago, IL.

4.

Barrett JG, Muir P, Sample SJ, McCarthy J, Kalscheur VL, Markel MD, Prokuski LJ. Effect of Short-term Treatment with Alendronate on Bone Structural Properties and New Bone Formation in Rats. Orthopedic Research Society Annual Meeting.  February 20-23, 2005, Washington, D.C.

5.

Barrett JG, Sample SJ, McCarthy J, Kalscheur VL, Vanderby Jr, R, Markel MD, Prokuski LJ, Muir P.  Effect of Fatigue Fracture on Ulna Blood Flow and Interstitial Fluid Flow in the Rat. Orthopedic Research Society Annual Meeting.  February 20-23, 2005, Washington, D.C.

EDITORIAL BOARDS

 

 

2003-2005

Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research

2003-present

Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons

VOLUNTEER ACTIVITIES

 

 

Feb 3-15, 2010

Operation Unified Response. In collaboration with the United States Military and the Orthopedic Trauma Association, I served on the hospital ship U.S.N.S. Comfort. I assisted military orthopedic surgeons providing the most sophisticated care available for patients injured in this natural disaster.

Aug 9-22, 2010

Distinguished Visiting Scholar Program.  I served as a visiting orthopedic trauma surgeon at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany. There I cared for U. S. and NATO soldiers injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom alongside military orthopedic surgeons.

ADDITIONAL TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

 

DEPARTMENTAL

 

2004-2005

Orthopedic Resident Boot Camp.  A seminar created to educate the new orthopedic resident just starting to take trauma call. Basic evaluation is reviewed as well as practicing placing cervical and skeletal traction.

MEDICAL SCHOOL/HOSPITAL

 

2000-2006

University of Wisconsin Madison Faculty Mentoring Program

2000-2008

Advanced Trauma Life Support Instructor

2000-2003,2008

Patient, Doctor, and Society Course Instructor

2003

Program Coordinator, Dr. Morrey Visiting Professor

STATE/REGIONAL

 

2004

Wisconsin Orthopedic Society Annual Meeting Program Chairman

NATIONAL

 

2002-present

AO/ASIF Instructor

2003-present

Reviewer, Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research

2005-2007

OTA Residents’ Comprehensive Fracture Course Upper Extremity and Hand Section Leader

2008-2011

OTA Residents’ Comprehensive Fracture Course Chairman

2011-present

OTA Residents’ Fracture Course version 2.0 Diaphyseal Module Chairman

INTERNET-BASED EDUCATION

 

 

1.

Prokuski LJ, DeSmet A, Heiner JP.  Musculoskeletal Amyloidosis. In: Orthopedic    Care: Medical and Surgical Management of Musculoskeletal Disorders. http://.orthopediccare.net

2.

Prokuski LJ. A Segmental Distal Femur Fracture, AO North America Case Presentation of the Quarter, AO Web Site, 2001. www.aona.com

3.

Prokuski LJ.  Fractures. AAOS Your Orthopedic Connection, 2006. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org

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